Writing Fiction (BWR105)

Location type
Level
Logo Academy for Distance Learning
Provider rating: starstarstarstarstar_half 8.9 Academy for Distance Learning has an average rating of 8.9 (out of 2 reviews)

Need more information? Get more details on the site of the provider.

Description

Learn to write and analyse fiction. This exciting and rewarding course could set you on the path to fullfilling your dream of writing your first fiction article. The course will teach you about the process of writing fiction and give you practical experience of writing your own fiction. You will develop your analytical skills, by analysing the writing of other authors.COURSE STRUCTURE

There are eight lessons in this module as follows:

  1. Scope & Nature of Fiction
  2. Components of a Story - beginning, middle and end
  3. Technique: The Creative Process - conception, developing a plot,writing a Draft, Editing and rewriting; Method Writing
  4. Conception and Research
  5. Drama
  6. Fantasy
  7. The Short Story
  8. The Novel

Read the complete description

Frequently asked questions

trainings.faqs. There are no frequently asked questions yet. If you have any more questions or need help, contact our customer service.

Learn to write and analyse fiction. This exciting and rewarding course could set you on the path to fullfilling your dream of writing your first fiction article. The course will teach you about the process of writing fiction and give you practical experience of writing your own fiction. You will develop your analytical skills, by analysing the writing of other authors.COURSE STRUCTURE

There are eight lessons in this module as follows:

  1. Scope & Nature of Fiction
  2. Components of a Story - beginning, middle and end
  3. Technique: The Creative Process - conception, developing a plot,writing a Draft, Editing and rewriting; Method Writing
  4. Conception and Research
  5. Drama
  6. Fantasy
  7. The Short Story
  8. The Novel
AIMS
  • Describe the nature and scope of fiction writing.
  • Determine the components of a fiction story, as the first step in planning a story.
  • Determine a systematic approach to building a fiction story.
  • Develop your capacity to conceive fiction stories.
  • Develop your ability to write dramatic stories.
  • Develop your ability to write fantasy
  • Develop your ability to write short stories
  • Develop your ability to plan for success in the writing of a novel.
SAMPLE NOTES What is Fiction Writing?

Fiction is writing that includes imaginary characters, events and/or settings created by the writer. All of the components of a fictitious story do not necessarily need to be fictitious though:

  • Imaginary characters might be set in a real world setting such as a well known city or a particular country.
  • Characters might be fictitious, but set in a \'real\' event. For example, you might write about the experiences of a fictitious character during World War II.
  • Real characters may be used for a fictitious story that embraces an imaginary event or setting (eg. a story about William Shakespeare travelling through time; or something more realistic, like a summer\'s holiday at a fictitious beach resort, taken by a famous historical figure such as Mozart).
Two Types of Fiction

There are traditionally two types of fiction:

a) CATEGORY
Also referred to as \'genre\', these stories have a distinct theme and as such are easy to categorise. Examples of category or genre fiction are science fiction, westerns, adventure, historical, romance, erotica, mystery, suspense, fantasy and war stories.

b) MAINSTREAM
These stories are aimed at the widest possible audience. They typically deal with most aspects of modern life including relationships, careers, and the search for success and fulfilment. Popular mainstream writers include Jeffrey Archer, Jackie Collins, Colleen McCullough and James Michener.

One aspect of this course involves both factual information geared to developing an understanding of processes. Another major part of this course involves you undertaking practical tasks of writing pieces of your own fiction; and analyzing the writing of other authors.

Fiction is writing that encompases imaginary characters, events and/or settings created by the writer. All of the components of a fictitious story do not necessarily need to be fictitious though:

  • Imaginary characters might be set in a real world setting such as a well known city or a particular country.
  • Characters might be fictitious, but set in a ¢‚¨≈ìreal¢‚¨ù event. For example, you might write about the experiences of a fictitious character during World War II.
  • Real characters may be used for a fictitious story that embraces an imaginary event or setting (eg. a story about William Shakespeare travelling through time; 00or something more realistic, like a summer¢‚¨‚s holiday at a fictitious beach resort, taken by a famous historical figure such as Mozart).

What Type of Fiction Interests You?

There are many different types of fiction; and once you learn the principles taught in this course, you should have a foundation to tackle whichever interests you. These categories may include:

Fantasy

The dictionary defines fantasy as ¢‚¨≈ìfancy, mental image; caprice; hallucination¢‚¨ù.

Fantasy always includes events that are unlikely, if not impossible, in real life. It usually contains unrealistic settings, characters and events.

Fantasy is a broad term that can encompass a range of different categories including fairy tales, myths, fables, science fiction, and others.

Fairy Tales

Fairy tales are fictitious stories that involve romance and legendary deeds, where the characters include fictitious creatures such as fairies, witches, wizards, dragons, gnomes and elves. They are usually, but not always exclusively, written for children.

Fables

Fables are stories which teach a moral (i.e. a principle or rule to live by). They often include animals or inanimate objects that are personified. Aesop¢‚¨‚s tales (eg The Tortoise and the Hare) are classic examples of fables.

Myths

Myths are stories designed to explain a belief, natural event or phenomenon. The word ¢‚¨≈ìmyth¢‚¨ù has evolved in modern times and has come to be associated with things that are not true but it originally derives from the Greek word mythos, which simply means narrative or story. Myths concern extra-ordinary characters (usually heroes or gods) and are usually attempts to explain or interpret natural events in a supernatural way. All cultures and religions have their own mythology, including the Aboriginal ¢‚¨≈ìDreamtime¢‚¨ù used to explain creation, the Christian stories of creation and Noah¢‚¨‚s ark, and the extensive Greek mythology relating to its various deities and their activities.

Legends

Legends are stories passed down through generations of people, which originated so long ago that their truth cannot be verified. They may be partially or fully fictitious, but there is no way to be sure. The main character may often be real (i.e. he/she/it actually existed), and the setting may very well have been real but the tales may have been embellished in the retelling. They sometimes involve elements of the supernatural.

Science Fiction

Science fiction is fantasy that incorporates science or technology into the story. Often the setting is in the future, in space or on another planet; but this does not necessarily need to be the case. Science fiction can be set in the real world, but simply incorporate some ¢‚¨≈ìimaginary¢‚¨ù elements of science or technology. It can even be set in the past.

Westerns

Westerns are stories where the setting is in the frontier American west; usually stories about cowboys or cowboys and Indians.

Drama

A drama is a story that stirs the emotions. It makes people feel tense at times, and more relaxed at other times; sad on occasions, and happy on other occasions. It is usually an emotional roller coaster.

Romance

Romance stories also stir the emotions, but are normally gentler than dramas. They may create the emotional highs and lows of a period, but the overall feeling of the story should be a warm, perhaps calming and satisfying one.

Comedy

Comedies are designed to make people laugh or at least smile. They can range from slapstick comedy, where the drive is physical conflict (eg a man¢‚¨‚s head comes into conflict with a bucket full of paint), right through the black comedy, where subjects that are usually treated in a serious way (eg death) become the source of humour.

Horror

Horror stories prey upon universal human fears, such as fear of death, mutilation, monsters etc to give readers the thrill of fear and of exploring the taboo. Originally borne out of primitive fears of the devil and supernatural evil forces, horror stories often revolve around evil entities intruding into everyday life. They are designed to alarm and terrify while simultaneously exciting readers in much the same way as a ride at an amusement park might elicit screams of both terror and excitement. Generally, horror stories end with some kind of catharsis in which a level of normalcy is restored. This could be equated to the experience of a rider safely exiting a rollercoaster at the end of the ride. In this way, horror stories simultaneously unsettle and reassure the reader.

Crime

Crime fiction is a genre that covers a broad range of writing, from whodunits through to legal dramas. A branch of crime writing which is growing in popularity is one in which the writers explore the graphic and unsettling elements of violent crime (including lurid descriptions of the corpse, method of dispatch and autopsy scenes). The genre could be considered the horror genre of the contemporary era in the sense that it plays upon modern fears and insecurities (eg of being raped or murdered in an increasingly violent society). As with horror stories, the denouement generally involves a catharsis of some kind, eg the killer is caught, but this is not necessarily the case. In Bret Ellis¢‚¨‚ novel American Psycho, the killer is never brought to justice, further fuelling the reader¢‚¨‚s niggling sense of being unsafe in a dangerous world.

Suspense

A suspense story aims to keep the reader guessing. It must contain uncertainty or anxiety. The reader will be told just enough to secure their attention, but information will be held back in order to build tension. It will finally be revealed at points in the story which are beyond where the reader desperately wants to know that information. In effect, the writer is creating a desire, and suspending delivery of information to satisfy that desire.

Erotica

Erotica is literature that deals with sexual love. Theoretically, it differs from pornography in the sense that it aspires to an artistic aesthetic rather than simply aiming to stimulate sexual desire for commercial purposes.

Do you want to be a novelist?

This course will introduce you to the techniques you need to help you become a great fiction writer. Learn the basics of plot development, characterisation and developing your own style. Study different genres of writing and identify the characteristics that set them apart from each other. Learn how to plan a novel and submit a manuscript. Above all, learn how to turn your germ of an idea into a potentially publishable work.

There are no reviews yet.

Share your review

Do you have experience with this course? Submit your review and help other people make the right choice. As a thank you for your effort we will donate £1.- to Stichting Edukans.

trainings.faqs. There are no frequently asked questions yet. If you have any more questions or need help, contact our customer service.